South Korea Letter

27 American scientists and environmentalists write to President Moon Jae-in saying that the South Korea’s planned shift from nuclear power to green energy will actually hurt the environment. The letter was originally published on www.environmentalprogress.org

 

July 5, 2017
 

Honorable President Moon Jae-in
The Blue House
Seoul, South Korea
 

Dear President Moon,

We are writing as scientists and conservationists to urge you to consider the climate and environmental impacts of a nuclear energy phase-out in South Korea.

Over the last 20 years, South Korea has earned a global reputation for its ability to build well-tested and cost-effective nuclear plants. South Korea is the only nation where the cost of nuclear plant construction has declined over time. And in United Arab Emirates, South Korean firm Kepco has proven it can build cost-effective nuclear power plants abroad just as it can at home.

There is a strong consensus among climate policy experts that an expansion of nuclear energy will be required to significantly reduce carbon emissions and improve air quality. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the International Energy Agency, and dozens of climate scientists and energy experts have affirmed the importance of nuclear energy to climate mitigation.

South Korea’s nuclear industry is especially important given the financial failures of French nuclear giant Areva and Japanese-owned and U.S.-based Westinghouse. If South Korea withdraws from nuclear then only Russia and China would be in the global competition for new nuclear construction.  

A phase-out of nuclear plants by South Korea domestically would profoundly undermine efforts by Kepco to compete for new nuclear construction contracts abroad. Buyer nations would rightly question why they should buy nuclear plants from a nation phasing out its nuclear. And a domestic nuclear phase-out would atrophy the workforces and supply chains needed for South Korea’s global construction efforts.

Solar and wind are not alternatives to nuclear. In 2016, solar and wind provided 1 and 0.35 percent of South Korea’s electricity, respectively. For South Korea to replace all of its nuclear plants with solar, it would need to build 4,400 solar farms the size of South Korea’s largest solar farm, SinAn, which would cover an area 5 times larger than Seoul. To do the same with wind would cover an area 14.5 times larger than Seoul. 

The intermittent nature of solar and wind and the lack of inexpensive grid-scale storage require the continued operation of fossil fuel power plants. As a result, every time nuclear plants close they are replaced almost entirely by fossil fuels, which has resulted in higher emissions from Germany to California to Japan.

Given the intermittency of solar and wind and South Korea’s land scarcity, replacing the nation’s nuclear plants would require a significant increase in coal and/or natural gas, which would prevent South Korea from meeting its commitments under the Paris climate agreement, and would increase air pollution in Seoul.

The high cost of replacing closing nuclear plants would be better spent on technological innovation to make South Korean nuclear plants even safer and cheaper. Replacing nuclear with natural gas would require $23 billion as up-front investment in new plants, and $10 billion per year to pay for gas imports.

Instead of phasing out nuclear, we encourage you to lead an effort to both make nuclear even safer and more cost-economical than it already is through the development and demonstration of accident-tolerant fuels and new plant designs.

The planet needs a vibrant South Korean nuclear industry, and the South Korean nuclear industry needs you as a strong ally and champion. If South Korea withdraws from nuclear the world risks losing a valuable supplier of cheap and abundant energy needed to lift humankind out of poverty and solve the climate crisis.

We support the call by 240 South Korean professors and strongly encourage you to deliberate with a wide range of energy and environmental scientists and experts on these questions before making any final decisions.

We are grateful for your consideration of these ideas, and look forward to your response.
 

Sincerely,

Michael Shellenberger, Time Magazine “Hero of the Environment,” President, Environmental Progress

James Hansen, Climate Scientist, Earth Institute, Columbia University  

Kerry Emanuel, Professor of Atmospheric Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Pushker Kharecha, Columbia University, NASA

Richard Rhodes, Pulitzer Prize recipient, author of Nuclear Renewal and The Making of the Atomic Bomb

Stewart Brand, Editor of the Whole Earth Catalog

Robert Coward, President, American Nuclear Society

Ben Heard, Executive Director, Bright New World

Andrew Klein, Immediate Past President, American Nuclear Society

Steve McCormick, Former CEO, The Nature Conservancy  

Michelle Marvier, Professor, Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University

Richard Muller, Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley, Co-Founder, Berkeley Earth

Peter H. Raven, President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Garden. Winner of the National Medal of Science, 2001

Paul Robbins, Director, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Mark Lynas, author, Six Degrees

David Dudgeon, Chair of Ecology & Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, China

Erle C. Ellis, Ph.D, Professor, Geography & Environmental Systems, University of Maryland

Christopher Foreman, author of The Promise & Peril of Environmental Justice, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

Norris McDonald, President, Environmental Hope and Justice

Nobuo Tanaka, Sasakawa Peace Foundation

Gwyneth Cravens, author of Power to Save the World

Wolfgang Denk, European Director, Energy for Humanity

Kirsty Gogan, Executive Director, Energy for Humanity

Joshua S. Goldstein, Prof. Emeritus of International Relations, American University

Steven Hayward, Senior Resident Scholar, Institute of Governmental Studies, UC Berkeley

Joe Lassiter, Professor, Harvard Business School

Martin Lewis, Department of Geography, Stanford University

Elizabeth Muller, Founder and Executive Director, Berkeley Earth

Stephen Pinker, Cognitive Scientist, Harvard University

Samir Saran, Vice President, Observer Research Foundation, Delhi, India

Tom Wigley, Climate and Energy Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

 

https://i1.wp.com/cc3dmrkorea.dothome.co.kr/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Seoul02.jpg

Open letter to President Macron

This open letter, signed by 45 environmentalists, writers and academics, was originally published on Energyforhumanity.org

July 1, 2017
Dear President Macron,

We are writing as environmentalists, conservationists and climate scientists to congratulate you on your win in the presidential election, and to applaud your push for a carbon tax. Nobody has done more for advancing clean energy on the grid than France. In light of this knowledge, we are also writing to express our alarm at your decision to move France away from clean nuclear power.

Few nations have done more than France to demonstrate the humanitarian and environmental benefits of creating a high-energy, nuclear-powered, and electrified society. Not only was France host of United Nations climate talks, it also has some of the lowest per capita carbon emissions of any developed nation.

Any reduction in France’s nuclear generation will increase fossil fuel generation and pollution given the low capacity factors and intermittency of solar and wind. Germany is a case in point. Its emissions have been largely unchanged since 2009 and actually increased in both 2015 and 2016 due to nuclear plant closures. Despite having installed 4 percent more solar and 11 percent more wind capacity, Germany’s generation from the two sources decreased 3 percent and 2 percent respectively, since it wasn’t as sunny or windy in 2016 as in 2015.

And where France has some of the cheapest and cleanest electricity in Europe, Germany has some of the most expensive and dirtiest. Germany spent nearly 24 billion euros above market price in 2016 for its renewable energy production feed-in tariffs alone, but emissions have remained stagnant. Germany is set to miss its 2020 emission reduction goals by a wide margin. Despite its huge investment in renewables, only 46 percent of Germany’s electricity comes from clean energy sources as compared to 93 percent in France.

Solar and wind can play an important role in France. However, if France is to make investments in solar and wind similar to those of Germany, they should add to France’s share of clean energy, not inadvertently reduce it. Renewables can contribute to the further electrification of the transportation sector, which France has already done with its trains and should continue to do with personal vehicles.

Shifting from nuclear to fossil fuels and renewables would grievously harm the French economy in three ways: higher electricity prices for consumers and industry, an end to France’s lucrative electricity exports, and — perhaps most importantly — the destruction of France’s nuclear export sector. If the French nuclear fleet is forced to operate at lower capacity factors, it will cripple the French nuclear industry by adding costs and shrinking revenues. Eventually this will lead to poorer safety standards and less opportunities to fund research, development and efforts to export French nuclear technologies. Nations seeking to build new nuclear plants rightly want to know that the product France is selling is one that France itself values.

The French nuclear program has historically been the envy of the world. It demonstrated in the 1970s and 80s that the decarbonization of an industrialized country’s electricity sector is in fact possible. For France, the next necessary step to help combat climate change and improve air quality is to increase clean electricity from all non-fossil sources and massively reduce fossil fuels used in heating and the transportation sector. Nuclear power must play a central role in this.

Signed,

James Hansen, Climate Science, Awareness, and Solutions Program, Columbia University, Earth Institute, Columbia University

Kerry Emanuel, Professor of Atmospheric Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Hans Blix, Director General Emeritus of the IAEA

Robert Coward, President, American Nuclear Society

Andrew Klein, Immediate Past President, American Nuclear Society

Steven Pinker, Harvard University, author of Better Angels of Our Nature

Richard Rhodes, Pulitzer Prize recipient, author of Nuclear Renewal and The Making of the Atomic Bomb

Robert Stone, filmmaker, “Pandora’s Promise”

Pascale Braconnot, Climate Scientist, IPSL/LSCE, lead author for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report and Fifth Assessment Report

Francois-Marie Breon, Climate Researcher, IPSL/LSCE, lead author for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report

Ben Britton, Ph.D, Deputy Director of the Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Imperial College London

Claude Jeandron, President, Save the Climate, French association

James Orr, Climate Scientist, IPSL/LSCE

Didier Paillard, Climate Scientist, IPSL/LSCE

Didier Roche, Climate Scientist, IPSL/LSCE

Myrto Tripathi, Climate Policy Director, Global Compact France

John Asafu-Adjaye, PhD, Senior Fellow, Institute of Economic Affairs, Ghana, Associate Professor of Economics, The University of Queensland, Australia

M J Bluck PhD, Director, Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Imperial College London

Gwyneth Cravens, author of Power to Save the World

Bruno Comby, President, Environmentalists for Nuclear Energy

Wolfgang Denk, European Director, Energy for Humanity

David Dudgeon, Chair of Ecology & Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, China

Erle C. Ellis, Ph.D, Professor, Geography & Environmental Systems, University of Maryland

Christopher Foreman, author of The Promise & Peril of Environmental Justice, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

Martin Freer, Professor, Head of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Director of the Birmingham Energy Institute (BEI)

Kirsty Gogan, Executive Director, Energy for Humanity

Joshua S. Goldstein, Prof. Emeritus of International Relations, American University

Malcolm Grimston, author of The Paralysis in Energy Decision Making, Honorary Research Fellow, Imperial College London

Mel Guymon, Guymon Family Foundation

Steven Hayward, Senior Resident Scholar, Institute of Governmental Studies, UC Berkeley

John Laurie, Founder and Executive Director, Fission Liquide

Joe Lassiter, Professor, Harvard Business School

John Lavine, Professor and Medill Dean Emeritus, Northwestern University

Martin Lewis, Department of Geography, Stanford University

Mark Lynas, author, The God SpeciesSix Degrees

Michelle Marvier, Professor, Environmental Studies and Sciences, Santa Clara University

Alan Medsker, Coordinator, Environmental Progress – Illinois

Elizabeth Muller, Founder and Executive Director, Berkeley Earth

Richard Muller, Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley, Co-Founder, Berkeley Earth

Rauli Partanen, Energy Writer, author of The World After Cheap Oil

Peter H. Raven, President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Garden. Winner of the National Medal of Science, 2001

Paul Robbins, Director, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Samir Saran, Vice President, Observer Research Foundation, Delhi, India

Michael Shellenberger, President, Environmental Progress

Jeff Terry, Professor of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology

Tim Yeo, Chair, New Nuclear Watch Europe; former Chair, Energy and Climate Change Parliamentary Select Committee

 

https://assets.rbl.ms/8188149/980x.jpg

Climate Change: losing sight of the real target.

[this article was originally published on medium.com. We thank the author Bob. S. Effendi]


In September 2015, German Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks made a statement which shock the world, Germany is likely to fail its 2020 emission reduction target which fall short by seven percent [i].

How could this be, to a Climate Change champion with its 520 Billion Euro Energiewende Program which aim to make German energy mix 80% by clean energy, that is mostly wind and solar by 2050.

As its stand by 2015 Germany’s renewable already up to 30% of the total energy mix, probably the largest renewable energy mix in the world. But the irony is with all that renewable how could Germany predicted to miss the emission reduction target? Isn’t the premise to increase renewable shares so that to reduce CO2 emission.

It turns out that German electricity is consider among the dirtiest in Europe not only that but to make thing much worse in the past 5 years after the implementation of Energiewende, German electricity tariff has double making it the most expensive in Europe and is not affordable to some German.

According to Eva Bulling-Schröter, energy spokeswoman for Die Linke, Germany left party, between 2011 and 2015, about 300,000 German homes get their power cut off because they can no longer afford to pay their bills [ii].

McKinsey just release a 20 pages report on German Energiewende which was featured in Die Weld, a German National Newspaper, that Energiewende does not achieve its goal in reducing emission and it has put burden on the economy but despite these obvious facts German Government refuses to acknowledge that their energy policy has become a dismal failure [iii]. Basically, what McKinsey is saying that Energiewende is a 500 Billion Euro disaster.

The fact of the matter, Germany does not make it into the 10 cleanest electricity in Europe according to real-time map which measure CO2 intensity (www.electricitymap.org) created as an open source project by Tomorrow, a Climate Change concern organization. Germany CO2 intensity is runs around 350–450 gram CO2/kwh whereas Norway at no 1 (8 gram), Sweden at no 3 (37 gram), Switzerland at no 4 (63 gram) and France at no 5 (66 gram) [iv].

 

According to Massachusetts institute of Technology study even if the whole signatories of Paris Accord do everything what they pledge to do, it will only result in a slight reduction in global temperatures of just 0.2°C by 2100, global temperature will still raise to 3.1–5.0 degree to pre-industrial level. [v]

According to the study to meet the target, deeper cut on fossil need to happen. Which is obvious that a lot of these countries are not willing to give-up fossil as a dependable cheap economic driver and has become a strong industry with far reaching political influence but instead focusing on renewable. This should make you rethink maybe the world has lost sight what the real target is? Is the Paris Accord is really about climate change or something else?

It’s a simple question, if the objective of climate change is carbon reduction, then what should be the measuring stick then, is it: a) How much renewable energy you put or b) How much CO2 is in your electricity.

It’s a no brainer, off course is how much CO2 in your electricity (CO2/kwh) or how much CO2 per energy per capita (CO2/capita). Germany has shown that the more renewable you put does not relate to reduction of CO2 emission in fact it has the opposite effect which is as also shown in California.

Even in California where strict environmental and climate legislation has been enforced for many years and has the highest renewable mix in the US, but with all those effort it still is fail to reduce its emission and increases the electricity tariff which makes California electricity become the most expensive in the US [vi].

Ron Kirk, US Trade Representative, Clean and Safe Energy Coalition co-Chairman and former Mayor of Dallas put it bluntly “The more you put renewable the higher your emission and so is your electric bill as proven by Germany and California” [vii].

What Germany and California has proven is that you cannot make intermittent renewable, such as wind and solar as primary energy because of several reasons: 1) its low energy density thus requiring huge amount land and 2) can only deliver at best less than 25% of capacity thus at the end require a fossil backup 3) its intermittent nature, creates a problem to grid making the gird unreliable thus maintaining a reliable electricity service become costly for utility.

With that in mind, we should not lose sight of what is the real target, obviously not renewable but carbon reduction and the measuring stick should be CO2 intensity or CO2 per capita not renewable and to achieve that there is only one way to do it that is replacing all fossil especially coal as primary energy with another zero-emission energy source which can act as base load meaning operating 24/7.

It’s a simple formula, your primary energy mix should be more than 65% zero carbon energy, It’s either Hydro or Nuclear or combination. With Norway its 97% Hydro, or with France its 79% Nuclear or combination of the two like Sweden with Hydro 36% and Nuclear 35%.

It is a simple fact that without combination of these two form of energy there is no way you could achieve a decarbonization economy, it is not a theory but it is an indisputable fact. In fact, Nuclear produces more than 60% of zero carbon electricity in the world.

So it is ridiculous for countries which committed to climate change but follow in the foot step of Germany by closing down its nuclear power plant, such as Switzerland [viii]. The fact is that Nuclear was never on table or discuss in any UNFCC document. Even in the latest UN Deputy Secretary General speech on The Goal of Climate Change, there is a lot of mention of clean energy, a lot mention of wind and solar but no nuclear. Is Nuclear not a clean energy? [ix]

So in the end, if the discussion on climate change does not include Nuclear on the table then the Billion Dollar Question is: are they seriously want to fight climate change or just being anti-nuclear ?.

Jakarta, 6 June 2017

Bob S. Effendi

End Notes

[i] Germany unlikely to meet carbon reduction targets for 2020 | http://www.dw.com/en/germany-unlikely-to-meet-carbon-reduction-targets-for-2020/a-17802417

[ii] Over 300,000 poverty-hit German homes have power cut off each year | https://www.thelocal.de/20170302/over-300000-poverty-hit-german-homes-have-power-cut-off-each-year

[iii] ‘Die Welt’ Article Warns: German “Energiewende Risks Becoming a Disaster” …As Costs Explode! | http://notrickszone.com/2017/03/08/die-welt-article-warns-german-energiewende-risks-becoming-a-disaster-as-costs-explode/#sthash.3Ewp4tPQ.dpuf

[iv] List of countries according to the lowest emission | https://www.electricitymap.org/?wind=false&solar=false&page=highscore

[v] MIT News, Report: Expected Paris commitments insufficient to stabilize climate by century’s end | http://news.mit.edu/2015/paris-commitments-insufficient-to-stabilize-climate-by-2100-1022

[vi] Climate Change, and California’s Failed Solution | http://www.realclearmarkets.com/articles/2016/05/05/climate_change_and_californias_failed_solution_102154.html

[vii] Bloomberg TV interview May 25, 2016 : Ron Kirk | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqELgPdaX-g&feature=share

[viii] Switzerland votes to ban nuclear plants, shift to renewable energy in referendum | http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-22/swiss-voters-embrace-shift-to-renewable-energy/8545844

[ix] Energy is at the Hearts of Global Goals and Paris Agreement | http://newsroom.unfccc.int/unfccc-newsroom/energy-is-at-the-heart-of-global-goals-and-paris-agreement/

Il sogno del 100%

Il sogno del 100%

Affermazioni straordinarie richiedono prove straordinarie.

È ciò che pensiamo ogni volta che qualcuno rilancia, con grande enfasi mediatica, l’obiettivo del “100% rinnovabili”. Obiettivo ambizioso, certamente per molti auspicabile, ma che per ora si scontra con la realtà dei fatti e con incontestabili limitazioni tecnologiche ed economiche. Limitazioni spesso sottaciute o liquidate con eccessiva disinvoltura.
Di fronte ad annunci di traguardi così eclatanti, ci piacerebbe che giornalisti e commentatori, invece che lasciarsi andare a facili applausi, stimolassero i lettori ad un approccio – se non scettico – almeno un po’ più critico e attento. Se possibile inoltre, evitando di eccedere in indulgenti semplificazioni, che spesso finiscono per trasformarsi in fastidiose inesattezze. Un esempio tra tutti: l’annuncio de Il Sole 24 Ore, che lo scorso 26 aprile titolava <<Elettricità 100% rinnovabile? Si può fare in 20 anni, lo dicono anche Shell e Bhp>>, non lascerebbe spazio a dubbi.  Sembrerebbe una tesi avallata perfino dai rappresentanti delle lobbies petrolifere! Peccato che il link inglese citato a sostegno della tesi rimandi a sua volta ad un comunicato stampa – quello che la stragrande maggioranza dei lettori non andrà mai a consultare, fidandosi della fedele traduzione del giornalista – nel quale il traguardo fissato dall’Energy Transitions Commission per il 2040 è un più generico 80-90% di energie rinnovabili, sul totale dei consumi elettrici.
Ci si perdoni lo scrupoloso puntiglio, ma è sul rimanente 10-20% che si gioca la sfida, e sul quale meriterebbe fare le pulci. Dopotutto, i numeri sono numeri e le parole hanno un loro preciso significato, a meno che non si voglia confondere il lettore, lasciando intendere che la decarbonizzazione dell’energia elettrica, questa sì raggiungibile al 100%, abbia come unico protagonista le energie rinnovabili. Esistono invero anche altre tecnologie a basse emissioni, oltre a meccanismi di cattura e sequestro della CO2, questi ultimi citati nello stesso studio di cui sopra.
A tutti preme un futuro “a basse emissioni”, ma non esistono bacchette magiche, e alla favola de “il Sole è gratis” e delle tecnologie “a zero emissioni” vogliamo sperare che ormai non creda più quasi nessuno.
Numeri e annunci, inoltre, andrebbero sempre debitamente contestualizzati, ricordandosi che non è mai una buona cosa confrontare pere con mele. Il caso della Costa Rica è spesso citato ad immaginifico esempio di virtuosità verde, grazie all’elettricità prodotta quasi interamente attraverso fonti rinnovabili (il dato del 2016 si è attestato al 98%).
Quali siano le numerose – se non insormontabili – difficoltà di esportare questo modello in Paesi completamente differenti per dimensione, densità demografica, economia e disponibilità di risorse naturali, al lettore non è quasi mai dato di sapere. Basta tuttavia dare un’occhiata ai numeri, per rendersi conto che solamente i Paesi e le regioni favoriti dall’elevata montuosità del territorio e da climi abbondantemente pluviali, possono permettersi di soddisfare larga parte del proprio fabbisogno attraverso l’energia idroelettrica.  Per la Costa Rica tale valore sfiora il 70%, di fronte al quale il contributo dello 0,03% del fotovoltaico può solamente impallidire.

E’ proprio come ci racconta Greenpeace? Per scoprirlo, consulta la Tabella 1.

E ad ogni modo, se è l’idroelettrico il modello a cui far riferimento, grazie al suo patentino di fonte non solo rinnovabile ma anche stabile e sostanzialmente immune ai capricci intermittenti di Sole e vento [1], non è certo necessario scomodare lontani ed esotici Paesi!  Per l’Europa vale l’esempio della Norvegia, con il 98% di elettricità prodotta da fonti rinnovabili, di cui l’idroelettrico rappresenta ben il 96% [2].
Anche alcune regioni italiane ottengono risultati simili: Valle d’Aosta e Trentino Alto-Adige, per esempio, hanno prodotto nel 2015 rispettivamente il 99% e 94% dell’elettricità con le energie rinnovabili, eccedendo in larga parte i loro fabbisogni e garantendo quindi un’esportazione netta verso altre regioni italiane un po’ più avide di elettricità e meno fortunate dal punto di vista della disponibilità di bacini idrici montuosi.

In Costa Rica il 100% dell’elettricità è rinnovabile, ma l’elettricità copre solo il 22,4% dei consumi finali. Del rimanente, il 59,5% è garantito dai prodotti petroliferi. ktep = migliaia di tonnellate equivalenti di petrolio. Fonte IEA.

Torniamo al caso della Costa Rica. Un aspetto che spesso viene omesso, relativamente al famoso obiettivo delle rinnovabili al 100%, è che esso si riferisce sempre soltanto al settore elettrico, che per il paese centroamericano equivale a poco più del 20% dei consumi energetici finali (Tabella 1). Del rimanente, a farla da padrone sono – guarda un po’ – i prodotti petroliferi, che incidono per quasi il 60% sui consumi finali, trainati dal settore dei trasporti in cui non c’è ombra di auto elettriche, a biocombustibili o a gas… il 100% dei veicoli in Costa Rica viaggia con la tradizionale benzina o con il gasolio.
Non proprio un modello da seguire, nemmeno per un Paese storicamente “gommato” come l’Italia, in cui le cose tutto sommato vanno un po’ meglio.

un terzo dei consumi elettrici californiani, nel 2015 è stato coperto con energia elettrica d’importazione. Fonte www.energy.ca.gov

Lasciamo la Costa Rica e spostiamoci negli Stati Uniti, precisamente in California dove alcuni giorni fa sono tuonate le dichiarazioni del governatore Brown, in polemica con i nuovi indirizzi di politica ambientale annunciati dal presidente Trump.
Nel commentare la notizia in un articolo pubblicato da La Stampa, il direttore scientifico di Kyoto Club, Gianni Silvestrini, ha elogiato il provvedimento proposto dal presidente del Senato Kevin de Leon, in cui si rilancerebbero i già ambiziosi piani energetici californiani, fissando l’obiettivo entro il 2040 del 100% di energia elettrica prodotta con le fonti rinnovabili.
La crescita del solare fotovoltaico in California è stata effettivamente impetuosa negli ultimi anni, raggiungendo nel 2016 un contributo pari al 13% della produzione, rispetto al 7,7% dell’anno precedente. Un <<record mondiale>>, dice Silvestrini, se non fosse che il fabbisogno di elettricità della California è superiore di quasi il 50% rispetto alla produzione (Tabella 2). Ciò significa che la rete californiana, nonostante l’escalation solare, continua in larga misura a non essere in grado di reggersi sulle proprie gambe, dovendo ricorrere a consistenti nonché crescenti importazioni dagli stati limitrofi, in particolare dall’Arizona, Stato a tipica trazione nucleare. Snocciolando le tabelle con i valori disaggregati per fonte, emergono molte informazioni interessanti, soprattutto considerando le velleità della California di vincere la sfida green della decarbonizzazione.
Se infatti è veritiero che le centrali a carbone contribuiscono in California per meno dell’1%, è altrettanto vero che l’incidenza del carbone pesa per quasi il 20% sull’elettricità importata. Di fatto, complessivamente è esattamente “come se” due centrali a carbone, un paio di centrali a gas e una centrale nucleare (per una potenza nominale complessiva di circa 5 GW) producessero elettricità fuori dai confini della California, ad uso esclusivo dei consumatori della West Coast: fonti baseload politicamente scomode, ma indispensabili per equilibrare una rete interna assoggettata alla variabilità intrinseca delle fonti rinnovabili aleatorie.
È infine evidente come il ruolo marginale di idroelettrico, geotermico e biomasse, uniche fonti rinnovabili effettivamente baseload, differenzi in maniera inequivocabile la situazione californiana da quella della Costa Rica. Sulla base di quali soluzioni tecniche si pensa di raggiungere il target del 100% da fonti rinnovabili entro il 2045, nonché il ben più vicino traguardo del 50% entro il 2025? Sono interrogativi che meriterebbero un approfondimento, vista la già menzionata crescente dipendenza energetica dai vicini di casa, nonché la frequente occorrenza di blackout, riguardo ai quali la California vanta un triste primato.
La soluzione, secondo Silvestrini, sarebbe a portata di mano, visto che la California si è posta l’obiettivo di realizzare da qui al 2020 un sistema di stoccaggio di ben 1325 MW.  Peccato che questa cifra, a fronte di un carico di rete che nelle ore di picco si aggira attorno ai 50 GW (50.000MW), non sarebbe certamente sufficiente a compensare le ipotetiche fluttuazioni delle fonti aleatorie rinnovabili, soprattutto qualora se ne volesse aumentare il peso relativo nel paniere energetico. Già oggi le installazioni fotovoltaiche ammontano a più di 18 GW di potenza nominale, ma se si volesse innalzare la quota al 50% del fabbisogno, la capacità installata dovrebbe come minimo quintuplicare: qual è la sostenibilità economica di un sistema di accumulo in grado di redistribuire in fasce orarie meno favorevoli gli eccessi di produzione di un parco fotovoltaico di potenza doppia rispetto al picco massimo giornaliero? Davvero si crede di poter fare a meno di impianti di backup alimentati da combustibili fossili, in grado di rimpiazzare sole e vento quando il tempo fa i capricci [3]? O di “riversare” sugli stati limitrofi l’energia prodotta in eccesso, chiedendola in cambio quando ce n’è bisogno (senza farsi troppi problemi sulla fonte di provenienza). O di privarsi di uno “zoccolo” di energia pulita, affidabile e a bassissime emissioni di CO2 come il nucleare?

California, produzione elettrica e fabbisogno a confronto. Fonte: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Electric System Operating Data. Elaborazione dati: EIA

Un aiuto certamente significativo può venire dalla riduzione dei consumi e dalle operazioni di efficientamento energetico. Non dobbiamo tuttavia dimenticare che se da una parte il fabbisogno energetico primario potrà effettivamente scendere, dall’altra la maggiore elettrificazione dei consumi, da tutti indicata come la via maestra per raggiungere i traguardi di decarbonizzazione, determinerà inevitabilmente un aumento della produzione di elettricità [4].  D’altronde, 4 milioni di nuove auto “a zero emissioni”, previste in California entro il 2030, da qualche parte dovranno pur ricaricare le loro batterie!

In conclusione: in questa breve disamina abbiamo cercato di evidenziare, ancora una volta, come non esistano soluzioni facili a problemi difficili e come sia diffusa la tendenza dei media e degli opinion maker a semplificare – se non addirittura a banalizzare – aspetti estremamente problematici legati alla sfida della decarbonizzazione dell’energia.
Una sfida alla quale è doveroso non sottrarci, ma che deve trovarci armati del giusto senso critico e della consapevolezza che credere ai venditori di illusioni forse è un lusso che ormai non possiamo più permetterci.

Note:

[1] L’idroelettrico da bacino (non quello da acqua fluente) garantisce nel breve periodo un certo livello di programmabilità della erogazione di energia elettrica. E’ inoltre un’ottima soluzione per l’accumulo, tramite i pompaggi, dell’eventuale elettricità prodotta in eccesso da altri impianti, che viene riconvertita in energia potenziale gravitazionale. Tuttavia, in termini di affidabilità l’idroelettrico non è propriamente classificabile come una fonte baseload, poiché le variabilità stagionali non programmabili possono in alcuni casi essere piuttosto marcate. A titolo d’esempio nel nostro Paese, al record di produzione idroelettrica del 2014 (58,5 TWh), è seguita nel 2015 un’annata decisamente deludente, con una contrazione addirittura del 22%. Non si è trattato di un caso isolato: nell’arco degli ultimi 15 anni, a fronte di una potenza idroelettrica che, seppur di poco, è costantemente aumentata passando da 16,8 a 18,5 GW, la produzione ha osservato un trend sempre altalenante, con un minimo nel 2007 di 32,8 TWh.

[2]  Secondo il Consiglio dei Regolatori Energetici Europei (CEER) che ha recentemente pubblicato lo Status Review of Renewables Support Scheme in Europe, la Norvegia è stata  nel 2014 e 2015 il Paese con il più basso livello di incentivazione delle energie rinnovabili (16,20 €/MWh, meno di un decimo rispetto all’Italia).

[3] Esemplare è il caso della centrale solare a concentrazione di Ivanpah, in cui l’impiego di gas come sistema di backup nell’arco degli ultimi due anni di attività è aumentato addirittura del 66%.  Bruciare gas per sostenere la produzione di energia solare non è proprio la strada migliore per centrare l’obiettivo del “100% rinnovabili”! Sulla centrale di Ivanpah avevamo già dedicato alcune righe qui.

[4] Alcuni esempi: a) I due scenari valutati dal World Energy Council prevedono per il 2050 un aumento rispettivamente del 123% e del 150% di fabbisogno elettrico mondiale rispetto al 2010; b) il Clean Energy Scenario dell’International Energy Agency considera un incremento della produzione di elettricità di almeno il 70% entro il 2040; c) in tutte le proiezioni elaborate nell’Energy Roadmap 2050 dell’Unione Europea, la quota di energia elettrica sui consumi finali europei è destinata a raddoppiare rispetto ai valori del 2005.

Fonti principali consultate:

http://www.energy.ca.gov/almanac/

https://www.nei.org/Issues-Policy/Protecting-the-Environment/Life-Cycle-Emissions-Analyses

https://www.iea.org/statistics/
https://www.terna.it/it-it/sistemaelettrico/statisticheeprevisioni/datistatistici.aspx

https://www.worldenergy.org/publications/2013/world-energy-scenarios-composing-energy-futures-to-2050/

https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/weo-2016-special-report-energy-and-air-pollution.html

https://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/energy-strategy-and-energy-union/2050-energy-strategy

http://www.ceer.eu/portal/page/portal/EER_HOME/EER_PUBLICATIONS/CEER_PAPERS/Electricity

Energiewende dove vai?

[…se il nucleare non ce l’hai]

Fig. 1 Energiewende, il “quadro della situazione”
Fig. 1 Energiewende, il “quadro della situazione”

Le Elezioni Federali previste per quest’anno in Germania sono molto attese, non solo dal popolo tedesco. La data deve ancora essere stabilita; è probabile venga scelta una domenica tra fine estate ed inizio autunno. Viene da pensare ai ben noti versi “Si sta come / d’autunno / sugli alberi / le foglie”. Vale a dire che alcuni segnali, seppur deboli, danno la Energiewende candidata ad una sostanziale revisione. Altri segnali piuttosto forti la ritraggono in grave crisi d’identità. Questi ultimi sono stati oggetto di una nostra lunga dissertazione. Riassumiamo brevemente qui di seguito i punti salienti delle precedenti puntate:

  1. l’utilizzo di carbone fossile e lignite nel settore elettrico non solo non è drasticamente diminuito nonostante la crescita senza precedenti delle FER (Fonti di Energia Rinnovabili), ma dopo la decisione di “uscire dal nucleare” è in ripresa;

  2. le emissioni di gas-serra della Germania sono tra le più alte nei Paesi OCSE e le più alte in assoluto tra i Paesi UE;

  3. la bolletta elettrica tedesca è la più alta in Eurolandia.

Nel frattempo le cose non sono migliorate.

L’inverno del nostro scontento

Il produttore russo di gas Gazprom ci informa che le sue esportazioni verso la Germania hanno raggiunto un livello record nel 2016 e che hanno registrato un’impennata dall’inizio di quest’anno [1].

Fig. 2 Diagramma età-capacità delle centrali elettriche a carbone attive nei principali Paesi europei. A sinistra suddivisione per Paese e per gruppi di età. A destra suddivisione per gruppi di età. Si noti che la maggior parte della capacità di generazione elettrica è fornita da impianti in età compresa tra i 30 e i 40 anni, perlopiù tedeschi. Nella sola Germania il totale dei gigawatt delle nuove installazioni commissionate negli ultimi dieci anni è grossomodo pari a tutta la capacità di generazione delle centrali a carbone operative in Italia. Difficilmente la Germania riuscirà a mantenere obiettivi di riduzione delle emissioni di gas serra coerenti alle direttive UE a meno che tutti questi impianti non siano spenti definitivamente prima della fine del loro ciclo di vita. Fonte: “A Stress Test for Coal in Europe under the Paris Agreement. Scientific Goalposts for a Coordinated Phase-Out and Divestment“, Climate Analytics, Feb. 2017, p. 11
Fig. 2 Diagramma età-capacità delle centrali elettriche a carbone attive nei principali Paesi europei. A sinistra suddivisione per Paese e per gruppi di età. A destra suddivisione per gruppi di età. Si noti che la maggior parte della capacità di generazione elettrica è fornita da impianti in età compresa tra i 30 e i 40 anni, perlopiù tedeschi. Nella sola Germania il totale dei gigawatt delle nuove installazioni commissionate negli ultimi dieci anni è grossomodo pari a tutta la capacità di generazione delle centrali a carbone operative in Italia. Difficilmente la Germania riuscirà a mantenere obiettivi di riduzione delle emissioni di gas serra coerenti alle direttive UE a meno che tutti questi impianti non siano spenti definitivamente prima della fine del loro ciclo di vita. Fonte: “A Stress Test for Coal in Europe under the Paris Agreement. Scientific Goalposts for a Coordinated Phase-Out and Divestment“, Climate Analytics, Feb. 2017, p. 11

Secondo gli eco-modernisti di Environmental Progress [2] in Germania lo scorso anno le emissioni di anidride carbonica del settore elettrico sono state superiori del 43% a causa del mancato contributo dei reattori nucleari “chiusi” nel 2011 e nonostante l’incremento del contributo delle FER: 308 milioni di tonnellate di CO₂ anziché 215.

E tutto questo ha un costo. Con forte rischio di aumento, non fosse altro perché esiste una buona correlazione tra capacità di generazione elettrica da FER aleatorie (eolico e solare) e costi elevati dell’energia elettrica (Fig. 3).

Prima o poi i nodi vengono al pettine. Sembrerebbe non mancare molto.

Fig. 3 Correlazione tra capacità di generazione elettrica pro capite da fonte eolica e solare e costo dell’elettricità per le utenze domestiche. Fonte: Roger Andrews, “Energy Prices in Europe”, Energy Matters, January 2, 2017
Fig. 3 Correlazione tra capacità di generazione elettrica pro capite da fonte eolica e solare e costo dell’elettricità per le utenze domestiche. Fonte: Roger Andrews, “Energy Prices in Europe”, Energy Matters, January 2, 2017

Intanto, da qualche settimana l’inverno ha portato con sé in Germania un certo scontento.
Qualcuno si è spinto addirittura ad ipotizzare che gli eventi meteorologici che stanno caratterizzando la stagione potrebbero passare alla storia per aver costretto la
Energiewende a rivelarsi per quella che veramente è: una transizione energetica priva di valide fondamenta, insostenibile ed incapace di successi duraturi.

058

059

Fig. 4Andamento dei consumi elettrici tedeschi e della generazione suddivisa per fonti, nei mesi di dicembre 2016, gennaio 2017 e febbraio 2017. In viola, tra quelle convenzionali è considerata anche la produzione elettronucleare. Fonte: Agorameter di Agora Energiewende
Fig. 4 Andamento dei consumi elettrici tedeschi e della generazione suddivisa per fonti, nei mesi di dicembre 2016, gennaio 2017 e febbraio 2017. In viola, tra quelle convenzionali è considerata anche la produzione elettronucleare. Fonte: Agorameter di Agora Energiewende

La produzione di energia elettrica da fonte eolica e solare è stata più bassa delle peggiori previsioni per diverse settimane. In particolare le prestazioni di dicembre sono state catastrofiche grazie alla nebbia fitta persistente in tutta l’Europa centrale. Fatta eccezione per alcuni irriducibili scettici, ben pochi si sarebbero aspettati di vedere immobili per giorni e giorni quasi tutti gli aerogeneratori di Germania, compresi quelli in mare aperto, e di riscontrare altrettanto flebili “segni vitali” negli immensi parchi fotovoltaici. I dati compilati da Agora Energiewende presentano risultati terribili per fotovoltaico ed eolico tra il 2 e l’8 dicembre e dal 12 al 14: per esempio alle 15:00 del 12/12/2016 la domanda di potenza elettrica ammontava a 69 GW mentre l’offerta del FV era di appena 0,7 GW, quella dell’eolico 1,0 GW onshore e 0,4 GW offshore – totale 3% di copertura.

I grafici in Fig. 4 rendono evidente che stasi di così ampia portata possono persistere per diversi giorni. Non è necessario essere un tecnico od uno scienziato per percepire la gravità della situazione. Se ne sono accorti anche gli economisti!

Secondo Heiner Flassbeck, ex direttore di Macroeconomia e Sviluppo presso l’UNCTAD a Ginevra, questi periodi di sottoproduzione prolungata dimostrano che la Germania non sarà mai in grado di contare sulle fonti energetiche rinnovabili aleatorie, a prescindere da quanto e da come continueranno ad aumentare le installazioni di impianti che utilizzano tali fonti. Flassbeck ha lanciato il guanto della sfida alla Energiewende dal suo sito blog makroskop.eu lo scorso 20 dicembre [3], ed uno dei passaggi chiave della sua intemerata mostra chiaramente l’assenza di scopi “nuclearisti”. Leggiamo infatti: “Non si può contemporaneamente fare affidamento su enormi quantità di vento e sole, fare a meno delle centrali nucleari (per ottime ragioni), ridurre significativamente la fornitura da fonti fossili, e dire alle persone che anche così in futuro l’elettricità sarà sicuramente disponibile.”

Il prominente economista fa inoltre notare che in inverno condizioni meteorologiche simili, poco vento e molta nebbia (o comunque elevata foschia e/o nuvolosità), non sono un evento mai visto in Germania. Queste “pause” si sono sempre ripetute ogni pochi anni – e la cadenza potrebbe anche aumentare, aggiungiamo noi: “il clima che cambia e cambia male” per quale motivo dovrebbe essere favorevole alle prestazioni di eolico e fotovoltaico? Pertanto nel 2030, anche ipotizzando una triplicazione dei pannelli solari e delle turbine eoliche verrebbe soddisfatto a stento il 20% del fabbisogno di energia elettrica [4], partendo dal presupposto che la domanda non aumenti. E se invece i consumi elettrici vedessero un’impennata a seguito della progressiva sostituzione di benzina e diesel con l’elettrificazione dei trasporti? Con quali misure si pensa di sostenere una eventuale “rivoluzione dell’auto elettrica”? E se il costo di gas, petrolio, carbone e lignite non crescessero abbastanza per rendere competitivo economicamente lo stoccaggio dell’energia elettrica?

Oggi come oggi un investitore finanziario che preveda una crescita drammatica del prezzo dei combustibili fossili va cercato con il lanternino, sempre che esista. È più facile trovare qualcuno che vi dica pacificamente che il redde rationem per la Energiewende è dietro l’angolo e non occorra aspettare fino al 2030. È dunque sconcertante constatare la facilità con cui vengono offerte ai cittadini contribuenti certe rassicurazioni. E cosa si può dire di certe affermazioni come quella propagata di recente dalle più alte sfere politiche tedesche a proposito del fatto che entro 13 anni saranno autorizzate nuove immatricolazioni esclusivamente per auto elettriche?

Temiamo di dover concordare in pieno con Flassbeck [5]: “l’esempio della Energiewende dimostra ancora una volta che le nostre democrazie, nell’approccio politico tradizionale, sono mal equipaggiate per risolvere problemi di tale complessità. Di conseguenza, esse perseguono quella che ho chiamato di recente una ‘politica simbolica’: fanno qualcosa che si suppone punti nella direzione giusta, senza riflettere a fondo e senza nemmeno prendere atto delle conseguenze relative al sistema. Se va male, è colpa dei predecessori politici e nessuno si sente responsabile.”

Occorre dunque rimanere vigili e critici, soprattutto se cittadini contribuenti. Desiderare molto e sperare sempre in un buon risultato è di grande aiuto. Tuttavia, per quanto importanti, desideri e speranze non bastano. Purtroppo è molto pericoloso convincersi che il raggiungimento di certi obiettivi avvenga grazie a non ben specificati automatismi per il solo motivo che tali obiettivi sono più “giusti” degli altri. Ed è indispensabile usare prudenza e raziocinio soprattutto quando davanti a risultati deprimenti preferiremmo spegnere il cervello o continuare a fantasticare su scenari irrealizzabili.

I nodi vengono al pettine

Possiamo affermare che la decisione della Germania di uscire dal nucleare comporterà la sostituzione di un buon 14% della fornitura di energia elettrica del Paese entro la fine del 2022. È interessante notare che ben cinque degli otto reattori nucleari (in tutto 6,7 GW di capacità netta) ad oggi rimasti si trovano nel Sud della Germania. Le nuove centrali a gas già pianificate per la rete nazionale potranno colmare solo in parte la lacuna. Il resto dovrà venire dal “combinato disposto” di impianti locali a cogenerazione (combined heat-and-power, CHP), aumento della produzione da fonti rinnovabili, importazioni ad hoc e just in time e progressiva riduzione della domanda.

La locazione delle centrali nucleari da chiudere è un dettaglio per nulla secondario. Infatti le condizioni per la produzione di elettricità da fonti rinnovabili nel Sud della Germania sono ben lungi dall’essere ideali. Il potenziale del fotovoltaico è limitato principalmente dal fatto che le ore che permettono una produzione a pieno carico sono mediamente solo 955 ore all’anno in Baviera (i.e. fattore di carico dell’11% circa). Gli altri Land non sono certamente più “assolati”. Inoltre, la storica scarsità di mulini a vento è lì a testimoniare che le correnti d’aria sono troppo deboli per macinare il grano, figuriamoci per rendere produttivi gli aerogeneratori di elettricità. Pertanto occorre alimentare elettricamente la regione più industriale della Germania con altri mezzi.

Fig. 5Storico degli impianti eolici tedeschi su terraferma. A confronto la variazione della produzione elettrica lorda totale all’aumento della capacità netta di generazione. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE, Carbon Brief e AGEB 2016
Fig. 5 Storico degli impianti eolici tedeschi su terraferma. A confronto la variazione della produzione elettrica lorda totale all’aumento della capacità netta di generazione. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE, Carbon Brief e AGEB 2016

Lo stoccaggio dell’energia potrebbe essere una soluzione. Tuttavia, l’implementazione di batterie adatte allo scopo può avvenire solo gradualmente e per ora tale cambiamento interessa quasi esclusivamente gli impianti di piccole dimensioni – più che altro il fotovoltaico sui tetti [6].

Dunque questo tipo di soluzione continua a rimanere dietro l’angolo, senza che nessuno l’abbia mai vista realizzata su larga scala [7]. Ad aggravare la situazione gli impianti idroelettrici di pompaggio fino a 1 GW (come quello di Goldisthal) sono diventati inutili, o meglio economicamente insostenibili a causa della depressione dei prezzi sul mercato elettrico.

L’alternativa praticabile potrebbe essere quella di ottimizzare la rete di trasmissione che attraversa il Paese, per far arrivare ai grandi consumatori bavaresi l’elettricità prodotta dai grandi parchi fotovoltaici nelle regioni rurali orientali e da quelli eolici del Nord – una soluzione auspicabile anche perché questi parchi producono non di rado una quantità eccessiva di energia elettrica contemporaneamente. Il problema è che “rimodernare” la rete di trasmissione e distribuzione elettrica richiede interventi costosi per portare nella giusta quantità l’elettricità dove e quando serve e per evitare congestione da sovrapproduzione.

Fig. 6Storico degli impianti fotovoltaici tedeschi. A confronto la variazione della produzione elettrica lorda totale all’aumento della capacità netta di generazione. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE, Carbon Brief e AGEB 2016
Fig. 6 Storico degli impianti fotovoltaici tedeschi. A confronto la variazione della produzione elettrica lorda totale all’aumento della capacità netta di generazione. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE, Carbon Brief e AGEB 2016

C’è un’altra “scomoda verità”: i picchi di sovrapproduzione al Nord e ad Est non corrispondono necessariamente ai picchi di domanda al Sud e nonostante il continuo miglioramento della tecnologia eolica e fotovoltaica e l’aumento impressionante delle installazioni verificatosi negli ultimi anni il fattore di carico medio non migliora. Non sono riscontrabili segnali rassicuranti che permettano anche solo di intravedere la possibilità che queste fonti possano ricoprire il ruolo del nucleare. Anzi, come si può vedere dai grafici in Fig. 5, 6 e 7 i valori medi del fattore di carico complessivo di queste fonti registrati in Germania sono chiaramente al di sotto di quelli attesi.

In parole povere, il fattore di carico medio indicato nei grafici di Fig. 5 e 6 altro non è che il numero delle ore effettivamente produttive degli impianti in funzione in Germania nel periodo 2003-2015, considerati come un unico parco eolico on-shore e un unico parco fotovoltaico rispettivamente. Qualcuno potrebbe osservare, giustamente, che si tratta di una semplificazione molto spinta. In realtà, approssimando un sistema costituito da un numero elevato di impianti a fonte rinnovabile aleatoria distribuiti su di un territorio di notevoli dimensioni si ottiene comunque un’informazione basilare sulla capacità delle fonti in questione di sopperire alla domanda di elettricità che la rete deve gestire nel suo complesso.
Vediamo allora che il “sistema eolico” tedesco produce per 1300-1900 ore all’anno (grandi oscillazioni del valore medio del fattore di carico nell’intervallo 15%-22%); mentre quello fotovoltaico per 500-1000 ore all’anno (valore medio fattore di carico pari a 6%-11%), nonostante la crescita ad oggi inarrestata della capacità netta di generazione di entrambi.

Questi valori sono inferiori a quelli che ci si aspetterebbe esaminando i grafici in Fig. 7a e 7b.
Inoltre, laddove la dipendenza dalle condizioni meteorologiche è superiore, lo storico della produzione di elettricità rivela una netta mancanza di correlazione con l’aumento annuale della capacità netta di generazione. Nel 2009 a fronte di un aumento di circa l’8% della capacità netta di generazione da eolico
on-shore la produzione lorda è diminuita del 5% rispetto all’anno precedente e nel 2010 a fronte di un ulteriore aumento del 5% della capacità la diminuzione della produzione associata è stata del 2%.

Fig. 7a Fattore di carico di alcune centinaia di parchi fotovoltaici situati a diverse latitudini. Fonte: Roger Andrews, “Estimating Global Solar PV Load Factors“, Energy Matters 2014/06/20. La Germania è compresa fra i 47°16’15” N e 55°03’33” N di latitudine; per cui approssimativamente i valori attesi del fattore di carico sono nell’intervallo 8-16%
Fig. 7a Fattore di carico di alcune centinaia di parchi fotovoltaici situati a diverse latitudini. Fonte: Roger Andrews, “Estimating Global Solar PV Load Factors“, Energy Matters 2014/06/20. La Germania è compresa fra i 47°16’15” N e 55°03’33” N di latitudine; per cui approssimativamente i valori attesi del fattore di carico sono nell’intervallo 8-16%
Fig. 7b Distribuzione dei fattori di carico degli impianti eolici (sin.) e fotovoltaici (dex.). Dati raccolti a livello mondiale. Valore medio per eolico: 23-29%. Valore medio per FV: 11-13%. Fonte: M. Carbajales-Dale et al., “Can we afford storage? A dynamic net energy analysis of renewable electricity generation supported by energy storage”, Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, 7, 1538 DOI: 10.1039/c3ee42125b
Fig. 7b Distribuzione dei fattori di carico degli impianti eolici (sin.) e fotovoltaici (dex.). Dati raccolti a livello mondiale. Valore medio per eolico: 23-29%. Valore medio per FV: 11-13%. Fonte: M. Carbajales-Dale et al., “Can we afford storage? A dynamic net energy analysis of renewable electricity generation supported by energy storage”, Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, 7, 1538 DOI: 10.1039/c3ee42125b

Nonostante la necessità imminente di nuovi corridoi di trasmissione, in particolare quelli dal Mare del Nord ai territori di Monaco e Stoccarda, i progetti per le linee elettriche aeree sono afflitti da ritardi irrecuperabili e dall’opposizione apparentemente irriducibile delle popolazioni interessate dall’attraversamento. I timori riguardano potenziali danni all’economia del turismo dall’imbruttimento del paesaggio o danni ipotetici (più che altro immaginari) alla salute dall’esposizione alle radiazioni non ionizzanti o entrambe le cose.

Di conseguenza, il Governo federale ha adottato una risoluzione nel mese di ottobre 2015 per posare 1.000 km di cavi di trasmissione in via sotterranea, con una prima stima di 3-8 miliardi di euro di extra-costi. Queste cifre potrebbero essere facilmente superate entro la metà del prossimo decennio, grazie ad una maggiore elettrificazione dei trasporti e del riscaldamento. Inoltre, gli elettrodotti in cavo interrato hanno svantaggi che la tecnologia attuale non è ancora riuscita ad eliminare. Sono lontani dagli occhi, e quindi dai cuori (che possono continuare ad essere allietati dal romanticismo dei paesaggi teutonici), generano campi elettromagnetici se possibile ancora più innocui, non hanno restrizioni di peso, ma durano appena la metà delle linee aeree (40 anni e non 80), e a causa di problemi legati alla complessità impiantistica, all’usura, al surriscaldamento ed agli inevitabili sbalzi di tensione possono smettere di funzionare precocemente. Inoltre, per scavare occorrono permessi, espropri, compensazioni economiche, studi di impatto ambientale (soprattutto laddove sia inevitabile l’attraversamento di aree protette, di interesse naturalistico o storico-culturale), ecc. Non ci stupisce dunque il fatto che dopo la risoluzione summenzionata anche la via alternativa con i cavi interrati sia rimasta solo sulla carta. Le ultime notizie lasciano intendere che occorreranno almeno altri 2 anni per mettere in cantiere il progetto. Difficilmente i lavori saranno completati in tempo per compensare il pensionamento delle ultime centrali nucleari ancora attive.

In particolare il ritiro di ogni reattore nucleare nel Sud della Germania ridurrà la capacità netta di generazione mediamente di 1,3 GW, richiedendo misure precauzionali contro le interruzioni di corrente. Come già accennato, si potrebbe allora procedere con l’aumento delle tariffe per scoraggiare i consumi e/o stimolare l’utilizzo di tecnologie ad alta efficienza energetica. Ma i costi per i consumatori tedeschi stanno aumentando da tempo per svariati motivi [8], e sono attesi ulteriori aggravi per l’anno in corso legati alla trasmissione elettrica a lunga distanza (30 euro/anno in più per ogni nucleo famigliare di 3 persone), anche per i problemi di cui sopra.

In uno studio recente del Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) si calcola che i costi complessivi inerenti trasmissione e distribuzione dell’elettricità ammonteranno entro il 2025 a 55,3 miliardi di euro. Per allora il costo medio cumulativo della Energiewende potrebbe quindi superare i 25.000 euro per ogni nucleo famigliare tedesco di quattro persone.

Alle sofferenze dei consumatori fanno da contraltare quelle dei produttori di eolico, per i quali la carenza di capacità di trasmissione elettrica è divenuta talmente critica da potersi definire la pietra tombale della loro espansione economica. L’anno scorso ben 4,1 TWh di elettricità da eolico non sono stati consegnati alle utenze a causa della congestione della rete. Ed in tutta risposta il Governo federale ha deciso di limitare il tasso di installazione annuale degli aerogeneratori nei Länder del Nord a soli 902 MW fino al 2020.

Intanto, alla fine del 2015, per la Energiewende erano già stati spesi 150 miliardi di euro, esclusi i costi di espansione della rete. Nel febbraio del 2013 l’allora Ministro dell’Energia e dell’Ambiente tedesco, Peter Altmaier, dichiarò in un’intervista al Frankfurter Allgemeine che entro la fine degli anni 30 di questo secolo la Energiewende potrebbe venire a costare qualcosa come un trilione di euro (mille miliardi). Una stima da rivedere al rialzo?

Fig. 8In Germania quella elettronucleare potrebbe non essere l’unica tecnologia al tramonto
Fig. 8 In Germania quella elettronucleare potrebbe non essere l’unica tecnologia al tramonto

Siamo pronti per trarre delle conclusioni.

Inizialmente, la transizione energetica tedesca aveva dato almeno qualche segno chiaro di svolta, togliendo dal parco delle centrali elettriche alcuni gigawatt da carbone e petrolio, oltre ad un paio (discutibili) da nucleare “datato”. Ma poi il delirio conseguente l’incidente di Fukushima ha dato i suoi frutti velenosi, resettando in pratica la transizione in atto: dal 2011 il settore convenzionale degli impianti termoelettrici non ha fatto altro che espandersi, sommate tutte le nuove messe in servizio e tutte le chiusure per anzianità e/o non economicità. Di fatto la Energiewende è stata degradata ad un mero phase-out nucleare. Anzi peggio, perché ad oggi non esiste alcuna strategia per lo smantellamento delle centrali nucleari tedesche “in pausa” né esiste alcuna stima degli extra costi legati alla loro chiusura anticipata né alcuna previsione di chi dovrà sobbarcarseli veramente. O meglio, se esiste un piano per tutto questo è ben nascosto in un cassetto, affinché neppure i gestori delle centrali lo conoscano [9].

Incertezze all’orizzonte

L’ipotetica revisione della Energiewende potrebbe significare che il prossimo Governo federale sia indotto a “graziare” le rimanenti centrali nucleari se non addirittura a “resuscitare” alcune di quelle chiuse precipitosamente nel 2011?

Esistono validi motivi per pensare che l’industria nucleare tedesca sia ormai irrimediabilmente compromessa. La situazione è molto complessa e non scenderemo ora nei dettagli, ripromettendoci di approfondire in un’altra occasione. Ci limitiamo a segnalare che sia letteralmente sia metaforicamente sono state smantellate, perse o vendute moltissime risorse, materiali e umane. E non solo negli ultimi 6 anni. Il problema ha origine almeno dai tempi dell’Unificazione.

Rimaniamo tuttavia parzialmente fiduciosi. Non fosse altro perché le migliaia di impiegati nelle centrali nucleari tedesche con gli ancor più numerosi lavoratori del relativo indotto, fra qualche mese andranno a votare. Dunque, affinché dal segreto dell’urna non emergano sorprese sconvolgenti qualcheduno potrebbe iniziare già in campagna elettorale la revisione necessaria.

A questo proposito è interessante notare il solido appoggio di Alternative für Deutschland al settore nucleare. Questo partito emergente e molto discusso, continua ad erodere il blocco dei voti dei colletti blu (in generale di tutto il comparto produttivo) perlopiù appartenenti alla Spd ed alla CDU, specialmente nell’Est. Per evitarne il consolidamento, i partiti ora al governo potrebbero valutare di recuperare una buona fetta di voti riappropriandosi di alcuni punti del programma di AfD, per esempio quelli che riguardano il ridimensionamento/annullamento del phase-out nucleare e dei costi della Energiewende.

Alla luce di tutto questo, una ripresa dell’utilizzo della tecnologia elettronucleare in Germania sarebbe realizzabile? Soprattutto con effetti positivi concreti, ovvero con prospettive di mantenimento sul lungo periodo di un ruolo essenziale nell’approvvigionamento energetico del Paese, di crescita e rinnovamento?

Una siffatta ripresa forse potrebbe passare solo attraverso l’apertura a forti investimenti stranieri. Candidati possibili ce ne sono diversi, a nostro modesto parere. Spicca tra di essi la Cina. Quanto potrebbero essere pronti i tedeschi, sia la popolazione in generale che le loro élite politico-finanziarie, ad un cambiamento di rotta di tale portata, resta tutto da vedersi. Sussistono almeno un paio di ragioni per dubitare. La prima inerisce il fatto che è sempre valida la massima di Mark Twain: “è più facile ingannare le persone che convincerle di essere state ingannate.” E quindi indurle ad invertire rotta rimboccandosi le mani – aggiungiamo noi. La seconda inerisce il fatto che una tale apertura significherebbe essere veramente “globalisti”, o meglio davvero a favore del libero mercato, e non solo a parole nei bei salotti di Davos.

Fig. 9In Germania la tecnologia elettronucleare potrebbe non essere al tramonto
Fig. 9 In Germania la tecnologia elettronucleare potrebbe non essere al tramonto

Note:

[1] La Germania è il più grande mercato d’oltremare per la statale Gazprom, che attualmente fornisce un terzo del gas in Europa. Nel 2016 la Germania ha importato dalla Gazprom 49,8 miliardi di metri cubi, superando il record di 45,3 miliardi di metri cubi del 2015. Fonte: Reuters “Russia’s Gazprom says exports to Germany hit record high in 2016“, 17 January 2017

[2] Fonte: enviromentalprogress.org

Enviromental Progress è un’organizzazione fondata in California con lo scopo di creare un movimento internazionale per affrontare le due minacce ritenute più gravi per il progresso dell’ambiente: la continua dipendenza da legno e sterco nei Paesi poveri, e il cambiamento climatico. Attorno a EP ruota una rete di associazioni che potrebbero portare ad un concreto rinnovamento culturale dell’ambientalismo. Continueremo a seguirli con grande interesse.

[3] A proposito di segnali deboli (o forti, scegliete voi), l’articolo è stato rilanciato da energypost.eu, da theenergycollective.com e da thegwpf.com (forum della Global Warming Policy Foundation)

[4] Oggi come oggi le FER coprono già circa un terzo dei consumi elettrici tedeschi, ma questo avviene grazie al notevole contributo delle centrali termoelettriche a biomasse e della termovalorizzazione dei rifiuti. In generale nel settore delle biomasse la Germania è uno dei leader mondiali. Per approfondire si vedano i nostri precedenti post sulla Energiewende e le slide della conferenza “Utilizzo competitivo dell’energia da biomasse: vantaggi e limiti di una fonte rinnovabile“.

[5] “The example of Energiewende once again demonstrates that the traditional political approaches of our democracies are ill-equipped to solve such complex problems. Consequently, they pursue what I have recently called symbolic politics: democracies do something that is supposed to point in the right direction without thinking it through and without even taking note of the system-related consequences. If it goes wrong, the political predecessors were guilty and nobody feels responsible. Heiner Flassbeck, “The End of the Energiewende?“, January 10, 2017.

[6] Per maggiori dettagli consigliamo di consultare il Renewable Energy Storage Subsidy Program della KfW Development Bank, secondo la quale nel 2015 il 41% delle nuove installazioni di impianti a fonte solare in Germania includeva un sistema di batterie, stabilendo un nuovo record mondiale in questo campo.

[7] Per chi volesse approfondire la conoscenza dei problemi connessi allo stoccaggio dell’energia elettrica, proponiamo la lettura di uno studio pubblicato di recente su The European Physical Journal Plus: Wagner, F. “Surplus from and storage of electricity generated by intermittent sources“ Eur. Phys. J. Plus (2016) 131: 445. doi:10.1140/epjp/i2016-16445-3

Vi anticipiamo l’incipit dell’abstract: “Data from the German electricity system for the years 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2015 are used and scaled up to a 100% supply by intermittent renewable energy sources (iRES). In the average, 330 GW wind and PV power are required to meet this 100% target. A back-up system is necessary with the power of 89% of peak load.

[8] L’Agenzia Federale delle Reti (Bundesnetzagentur) ha innalzato la tassa verde per i consumatori domestici da 6,35 cent/kWh del 2016 a 6,88 cent/kWh per l’anno appena iniziato, più che altro per compensare la diminuzione dei prezzi dell’elettricità all’ingrosso. Un problema molto serio di cui abbiamo ampiamente parlato nei nostri precedenti post sulla Energiewende.

[9] Lo scorso dicembre la Corte Costituzionale tedesca ha deciso che le aziende che eserciscono le centrali nucleari chiuse in anticipo dovranno essere risarcite delle perdite conseguenti alla decisione del Governo federale. Al contempo ha respinto la tesi dell’esproprio con la richiesta di relativo risarcimento. Pertanto dovrà essere quantificato un indennizzo, che secondo la stima di Goldman Sachs riferita da Bloomberg, non dovrebbe superare il 10% di quello inizialmente richiesto da EOn, RWE e Vattenfall (€ 8 mld, € 4,7 mld e € 6 mld rispettivamente, secondo la World Nuclear Association). La corte ha stabilito che la cifra esatta sia calcolata entro il 2018.

In realtà le aziende coinvolte nel prepensionamento delle centrali nucleari tedesche sono quattro. La EnBW, che è posseduta per il 45% dal Land Baden-Württemberg, non ha mai contestato la decisione del Governo federale né richiesto compensazioni. Il Baden-Württemberg è governato dai Verdi.

A gennaio E.On e RWE hanno dichiarato di essere pronte a coprire i loro contributi alle spese di stoccaggio dei rifiuti nucleari in un unico pagamento forfettario (€ 10 mld e € 6,8 mld rispettivamente, secondo quanto riportato da Reuters).

Fonti: Bundesverfassungsgericht “The Thirteenth Amendment to the Atomic Energy Act Is for the Most Part Compatible with the Basic Law“, Press Release No. 88/2016 of 06 December 2016, Judgment of 06 December 2016, 1 BvR 2821/11, 1 BvR 1456/12, 1 BvR 321/12; Bloomberg “Utilities Win German Court Case on Atomic Exit in Blow to Merkel“, 06 December 2016; WNA http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/energy-and-the-environment/energiewende.aspx; Reuters “Germany’s E.ON and RWE to foot nuclear waste bill in one hit – CEOs“, 02 January 2017

Per ulteriori approfondimenti:

Sturm, Christine. “Inside the Energiewende: Policy and Complexity in the German Utility Industry.“ Issues in Science and Technology 33, no. 2 (Winter 2017)

La scienza del risparmio energetico

Tra le iniziative organizzate in occasione della manifestazione nazionale “Mi illumino di meno” (24 febbraio), segnaliamo l’evento promosso a Trieste dall’INAF-Osservatorio astronomico e dall’Associazione Science Industries.

Sarà presente come speaker anche il presidente del Comitato Nucleare e Ragione, dott. Pierluigi Totaro.

locandina

La vittoria di Pirro delle rinnovabili tedesche

[come una transizione energetica a tappe forzate – o, meglio, drogate – sia per ora riuscita ad ottenere solo la caduta libera del prezzo dell’elettricità, maggiori costi per i consumatori finali e minore riduzione delle emissioni dei gas c.d. climalteranti]

Energia eolica in chiave espressionista
Fig. 1 Energia eolica in chiave espressionista

L’andamento dei prezzi per l’elettricità registrato dalla European Energy Exchange AG (EEX, Borsa Europea dell’Energia) di Lipsia parla chiaro. Mentre i consumatori tedeschi sono costretti a pagare sempre di più l’elettricità, le tariffe quotate sul mercato all’ingrosso da fonte carbone, gas e nucleare vanno nella direzione opposta da anni.

E a dirla tutta, le cose non andavano certo bene per E.ON, RWE, EnBW, Vattenfall, e centinaia di altre aziende di pubblica utilità, quando il prezzo era di 35 €/MWh, due anni fa. Ora queste aziende possono a malapena tenere il passo con continui e drastici tagli per risparmiare sui costi.

Con l’energia elettrica prodotta che viene venduta ad un prezzo maledettamente basso, la produzione delle centrali elettriche convenzionali tedesche quest’anno avrà un valore di appena 8,7 miliardi di euro. Circa un terzo del valore di 5 anni fa. Mentre tale produzione “convenzionale” costituisce ancora circa due terzi del totale dell’elettricità tedesca.

E le compagnie energetiche non si limitano a piangere miseria, hanno iniziato a chiudere gli impianti meno redditizi: l’Agenzia Federale delle Reti [1] ha già registrato 57 casi, ne sono attesi molti altri.

Tuttavia non è tutto così semplici e lineare. Per esempio, è curioso notare come in 10 anni siano velocemente cambiate le cose all’ombra della Energiewende. Infatti, nel 2006, quando la Germania aveva già da tempo iniziato la sua transizione energetica, la RWE lanciò il più grande programma di investimenti della sua storia, pari a circa 15 miliardi di euro: mentre i tedeschi installavano a tutto spiano pannelli fotovoltaici sui tetti, RWE calava la pietra angolare di centrali elettriche a carbone gigantesche. E nel tempo le centrali a gas naturale sono state costruite perfino su di una scala maggiore e dietro esplicita richiesta dei legislatori. Quest’ultimo tipo di impianti, essendo flessibili, ad accensione rapida e a spegnimento rapido, è considerato infatti il complemento perfetto alla produzione da fonti rinnovabili che dipende dalle condizioni atmosferiche.

Oggi questo “complemento perfetto” non è più così perfetto, perché al beneficio tecnico si contrappone un costo economico deleterio. Quella che poteva essere vista come una collaborazione tra “nemici” è ora una vera e propria battaglia, ad armi impari.

Prima però di approfondire i dettagli economici riteniamo sia opportuno analizzare quelli tecnici – vale a dire i risultati concreti della Energiewende in termini di sostituzione delle fonti per la produzione di energia elettrica.

Abbiamo visto che i gestori di centrali elettriche convenzionali lamentano grosse perdite in Germania; vuol dire che il piano sta funzionando? Non fidandoci delle lagne dei gestori di cui sopra (gestori che tra le altre cose operano largamente anche nel settore delle FER), abbiamo pensato bene di sentire altre voci.

In primo luogo abbiamo chiesto lumi a chi della “lotta ai cambiamenti climatici” ne ha fatto una professione, vale a dire il Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme (Fraunhofer ISE), rinomato istituto di ricerca di Friburgo, che tra le altre cose fornisce aggiornamenti quasi in tempo reale sulla produzione di elettricità in Germania, su import ed export, e molto altro ancora. E a chi ne ha fatto una passione come il think tank Carbon Brief.

Incrociando i dati raccolti abbiamo subito notato un’inversione di tendenza nel settore elettrico, scaturita anche dal drastico ridimensionamento della flotta delle centrali nucleari operative, attuato cinque anni fa per decreto federale. Per ovvi motivi, abbiamo deciso di chiamare “Effetto Fukushima” questa evidente frattura della transizione energetica tedesca. In Fig. 2 il grafico è di per sé eloquente: il periodo di maggiore efficacia della Energiewende (2002-2010) dura fino alla decisione “precipitosa” del Governo federale di “uscire dal nucleare”, con effetto immediato per metà delle unità allora operative. A partire dal 2011 parte la rimonta delle centrali termoelettriche convenzionali, guidata dal carbone fossile.

“Effetto Fukushima” sulla Energiewende. Nel periodo 2002-2010, antecedente la decisione “precipitosa”del Governo federale inerente il phase-out nucleare, il “parco convenzionale” delle centrali termoelettriche in Germania dava chiari segnali di ridimensionamento. Subito dopo il ritiro anticipato di circa la metà della capacità di generazione elettronucleare risulta impressionante il cambiamento di tendenza, con la “rimonta” guidata dal carbone (nelle due “versioni”, hard e brown). Si noti inoltre che in entrambe le pile i maggiori incrementi netti riguardano impianti caratterizzati da valori del fattore di carico particolarmente bassi. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE 2016 e Carbon Brief 2016
Fig. 2 “Effetto Fukushima” sulla Energiewende. Nel periodo 2002-2010, antecedente la decisione “precipitosa”del Governo federale inerente il phase-out nucleare, il “parco convenzionale” delle centrali termoelettriche in Germania dava chiari segnali di ridimensionamento. Subito dopo il ritiro anticipato di circa la metà della capacità di generazione elettronucleare risulta impressionante il cambiamento di tendenza, con la “rimonta” guidata dal carbone (nelle due “versioni”, hard e brown). Si noti inoltre che in entrambe le pile i maggiori incrementi netti riguardano impianti caratterizzati da valori del fattore di carico particolarmente bassi. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Fraunhofer ISE 2016 e Carbon Brief 2016

Nel grafico sono considerati i valori cumulativi delle variazioni di capacità di generazione netta, ossia i risultati della somma algebrica della capacità di generazione elettrica dei nuovi impianti entrati in funzione (o rimessi in funzione, non abbiamo controllato) meno quella degli impianti disattivati nel medesimo periodo.

Naturalmente questo “Effetto Fukushima” è una semplificazione, non fosse altro perché mentre è assai facile spegnere velocemente una o più centrali nucleari, le nuove centrali termoelettriche a combustibili fossili non si costruiscono in un giorno. Tuttavia, la parziale “sostituzione” del combustibile fissile con quello fossile è in pratica avvenuta, ed i suoi effetti li abbiamo visualizzati con altri grafici che trovate più sotto, concernenti le emissioni di tonnellate di anidride carbonica equivalente. Inoltre, da un piano di transizione energetica ci si aspetterebbe che, anche se non vengono interrotte definitivamente tutte le nuove costruzioni di impianti a combustibili fossili, almeno non si verifichi un’inversione di tendenza come quella evidenziata in Fig. 2. Guardando separatamente i valori “in ingresso ed in uscita”, ed entrando maggiormente nel dettaglio, si scoprono infatti variazioni tali (per esempio, + 6,9 GW da hard coal, +2,7 GW da brown coal o +2,2 GW da natural gas nel periodo 2011-2015) per cui risulta davvero difficile ritenere la Energiewende un piano accurato di riduzione della dipendenza dai combustibili fossili del settore elettrico tedesco. Come avevamo già accennato nel nostro precedente post, è evidente che non c’è alcuna seria intenzione di dismettere il “parco convenzionale” delle centrali termoelettriche. Inoltre le nuove installazioni di impianti alimentati da FER stanno dimostrando di essere perfettamente inutili allo scopo.

In evidenza dai grafici in Fig. 2: valori cumulativi delle variazioni di capacità di generazione netta delle centrali termoelettriche in Germania, ottenuti sommando tutti i gigawatt delle nuove installazioni e sottraendo tutti quelli degli impianti disconnessi dalla rete elettrica. Periodi di riferimento: 2011-2015 e 2002-2010
Tab. 1 In evidenza dai grafici in Fig. 2: valori cumulativi delle variazioni di capacità di generazione netta delle centrali termoelettriche in Germania, ottenuti sommando tutti i gigawatt delle nuove installazioni e sottraendo tutti quelli degli impianti disconnessi dalla rete elettrica. Periodi di riferimento: 2011-2015 e 2002-2010

C’è anche un altro problema. Le nuove centrali termoelettriche convenzionali sono destinate ad essere esercite con un fattore di carico spaventosamente basso, vale a dire devono produrre molta meno elettricità di quella che sarebbero in grado di generare, e debbono essenzialmente fornire la copertura degli sbalzi non programmabili della produzione da fonti di energia rinnovabile che non siano idroelettrico e bioenergie (biomasse e rifiuti urbani). Pertanto si tratta di impianti ad alto rischio di lavorare in perdita, con tutte le conseguenze economiche del caso.

In Tab. 1 abbiamo riportato per i due periodi in esame (prima e dopo Fukushima) i valori delle variazioni della capacità netta delle centrali termoelettriche includendo anche quelle a biomasse, che pur essendo caratterizzate da un fattore di capacità teorico inferiore a quello delle centrali a combustibili fossili (per non parlare di quelle nucleari) sono comunque da considerarsi impianti a fonte non aleatoria, quindi utili per un carico di base della rete elettrica e per evitare black out. La crescita degli impianti a biomasse è notevole. Tuttavia i meccanismi domanda-offerta, ossia la necessità di fornire tutta l’elettricità richiesta dai consumatori nell’esatto momento in cui ne hanno bisogno non è faccenda semplice; per cui anche questa crescita vertiginosa e non taglieggiata [modalità ironia attivata] non è sufficiente.

Abbiamo analizzato la produzione interna lorda (PIL) e la copertura dei consumi interni lordi (CIL) di elettricità con i grafici in Fig. 3. Questa volta attingendo i dati direttamente da chi la Energiewende la deve “accudire”, ossia il Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie (BMWi), ed il gruppo di ricerca AG Energiebilanzen e.V. (AGEB), che vede riunite diverse associazioni di industriali ed economisti.

Nel primo grafico, con una scelta non casuale dei colori, abbiamo messo in evidenza il summenzionato “Effetto Fukushima”, ossia il fatto che tagliando la produzione elettronucleare la crescita di quella da FER non sia andata ad intaccare sensibilmente il ruolo dei combustibili fossili. E questo nonostante la sottoproduzione delle relative centrali termoelettriche.

033

034

a) produzione interna lorda (PIL) di elettricità in Germania dal 1990 al 2015; b) ripartizione della PIL in quattro anni fondamentali per la Energiewende; c) copertura consumi interni lordi (CIL) di elettricità in Germania negli stessi anni. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati AGEB 2016
Fig. 3 a) produzione interna lorda (PIL) di elettricità in Germania dal 1990 al 2015; b) ripartizione della PIL in quattro anni fondamentali per la Energiewende;
c) copertura consumi interni lordi (CIL) di elettricità in Germania negli stessi anni. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati AGEB 2016

La scelta dei grafici in Fig. 3b rimarca questo fatto: a partire dal 1990 la porzione di torta low carbon è cresciuta costantemente; ma nel passaggio dal 2002 al 2012 il rallentamento è significativo rispetto al decennio precedente, essendosi quasi dimezzata la parte più grande (nucleare) e solo triplicata quella più piccola (FER); quindi la “torta” al 2015 pur essendo “più bella” di quella al 2002 fa sorgere spontanea una domanda riguardo al mancato ruolo del nucleare. Come sarebbe andata se…? Cercheremo di rispondere fra qualche riga.

Storico della generazione di elettricità da fonti rinnovabili in Germania. Dal 2002 al 2015 l’incremento è stato pari al 415%, per la maggior parte dovuto ad eolico e biomasse/rifiuti di vario tipo. Fonte: BMWi 2016
Fig. 4 Storico della generazione di elettricità da fonti rinnovabili in Germania. Dal 2002 al 2015 l’incremento è stato pari al 415%, per la maggior parte dovuto ad eolico e biomasse/rifiuti di vario tipo. Fonte: BMWi 2016

Esaminando il dettaglio della composizione delle FER (Fig. 4) si nota in primis la crescita di fotovoltaico ed eolico e successivamente il ruolo preponderante di quest’ultimo. Vale la pena ricordare che entrambe queste fonti sono aleatorie. La produzione di elettricità da fonte solare dipende molto dalle condizioni meteorologiche, ovvero da soleggiamento ed insolazione, con variazioni stagionali notevoli, quella da eolico dipende totalmente dalle condizioni atmosferiche: se non tira vento o se ne tira troppo la produzione semplicemente si ferma.

Variazione giornaliera della potenza fotovoltaica in una giornata autunnale in Germania. Al picco, nel momento di maggiore produttività dei circa 39 GW installati sono produttivi poco più di 6 GW, l’84% della potenza è inutilizzabile per semplici cause naturali. I contribuenti ringraziano. Fonte: screenshot di uno dei grafici interattivi della SMA Solar Technology AG
Fig. 5 Variazione giornaliera della potenza fotovoltaica in una giornata autunnale in Germania. Al picco, nel momento di maggiore produttività dei circa 39 GW installati sono produttivi poco più di 6 GW, l’84% della potenza è inutilizzabile per semplici cause naturali. I contribuenti ringraziano. Fonte: screenshot di uno dei grafici interattivi della SMA Solar Technology AG

Quando invece le condizioni meteorologiche sono favorevoli le fonti aleatorie danno luogo a picchi di produzione ovviamente proporzionali in altezza all’ammontare della capacità di generazione delle installazioni; l’ampiezza dei picchi dipende invece dalla durata, nell’arco di una giornata, di tali condizioni favorevoli. Nel caso del fotovoltaico, è doveroso notare come i valori di massima produzione diurna, soprattutto nel periodo autunnale e invernale, siano largamente inferiori alla potenza nominale degli impianti, a causa della maggiore inclinazione dei raggi solari (Fig. 5). I picchi di produzione da eolico e fotovoltaico e l’ampiezza degli stessi possono inoltre essere sfasati rispetto all’andamento della domanda di energia elettrica (Fig. 6).

Andamento del fabbisogno giornaliero e della produzione elettrica in Germania, divisa per fonti per due tipiche giornate autunnali, rispettivamente feriale e festiva. Si noti la differenza di circa 20 GW di potenza richiesta sulla rete tra le ore diurne e notturne, con un picco in corrispondenza delle ore di massimo soleggiamento ⎼ soddisfatto tuttavia solo in minima parte dalla produzione fotovoltaica ⎼ e un secondo picco, meno marcato, nelle fascia oraria serale. Fonte: screenshot di uno dei grafici interattivi del sito agora-energiewende.de
Fig. 6 Andamento del fabbisogno giornaliero e della produzione elettrica in Germania, divisa per fonti per due tipiche giornate autunnali, rispettivamente feriale e festiva. Si noti la differenza di circa 20 GW di potenza richiesta sulla rete tra le ore diurne e notturne, con un picco in corrispondenza delle ore di massimo soleggiamento ⎼ soddisfatto tuttavia solo in minima parte dalla produzione fotovoltaica ⎼ e un secondo picco, meno marcato, nelle fascia oraria serale. Fonte: screenshot di uno dei grafici interattivi del sito agora-energiewende.de

 

Tale “mancanza di sintonia” è illustrata anche nel grafico in Fig. 3c. Qui i valori percentuali per l’export dell’energia elettrica sono negativi perché si tratta in pratica di una percentuale della produzione di elettricità che uscendo dai confini della rete elettrica tedesca non va a coprire i consumi interni lordi (CIL). Viceversa, la percentuale dell’import ha valori positivi, perché considerata come una “aggiunta” alla PIL fatta al momento giusto, ossia tutte le volte che per motivi vari l’offerta interna non risponde pienamente alla domanda interna. Non è possibile dimostrare che tale disaccoppiamento tra domanda ed offerta interna sia in gran parte o interamente attribuibile alla aleatorietà delle FER ‒ almeno con i dati in nostro possesso. Ciononostante, dalla visione d’insieme dei grafici in Fig. 3 emerge chiaramente che nello stesso periodo di tempo in cui è aumentata la quota PIL da FER è aumentata anche la quota percentuale esportata.

Si tratta di semplice correlazione, e non di causa-effetto? Rimane il dubbio, ma anche il fatto che dalla metà del 2012 la centrale nucleare di Temelin in Repubblica Ceca opera a circa 100 MW(e) al di sotto della sua capacità [4], per evitare problemi di sicurezza della rete causati dagli sbalzi di tensione generati dalla produzione di elettricità da FER in Germania. Dopo la Repubblica Ceca anche la Polonia ha installato sul proprio confine con la Germania dei particolari trasformatori di potenza [5] in grado di bloccare il dumping elettrico [6]; Francia, Olanda e Belgio ne erano già forniti.

Per completare il quadro tecnico manca ora solo un ultimo tassello, in altre parole occorre rispondere alla domanda delle domande: l’aumento significativo del ruolo delle FER nel settore elettrico tedesco ha comportato una riduzione altrettanto significativa delle emissioni di gas climalteranti?

In questo caso ci siamo rivolti ai “cattivi”, ossia a chi una certa esperienza nel campo se l’è fatta da qualche lustro: British Petroleum. A parte gli scherzi, la BP fornisce anche interessanti raccolte dati e proiezioni sul futuro energetico del Mondo, utilizzando diverse fonti ufficiali, tra cui i ministeri competenti dei vari Paesi.

Prima di snocciolare tutti i numeri, partiamo da una considerazione di fondo: lo “spartiacque” temporale per analizzare gli effetti delle politiche energetiche della Germania è il 2001, anno nel quale entrò effettivamente in vigore la legge federale a sostegno delle energie rinnovabili approvata dalle Camere l’anno precedente (la EEG, Erneuerbare-Energien-GesetzRenewable Energy Sources Act): la spinta aggressiva del solare e dell’eolico al motore della Energiewende iniziò proprio all’alba del XXI secolo.
Tuttavia, l’andamento delle emissioni di gas climalteranti in Germania negli ultimi 50 anni (Fig. 7a) non lascia spazio a dubbi: una transizione energetica “low-carbon” era stata avviata nei fatti già nella prima metà degli anni ‘70, quando la crisi petrolifera mondiale costrinse i Paesi occidentali a rivedere i propri consumi energetici, con un progressivo ridimensionamento del ruolo dei petrolio e dei suoi derivati, cosa che in Germania avvenne grazie al boom del settore elettronucleare e ad un impiego più massiccio del gas come combustibile per il riscaldamento e la produzione di elettricità [7].  In particolare, proprio grazie all’espansione della flotta dei reattori, se nel 1973 la Germania dipendeva per oltre il 98% dai combustibili fossili, tale valore si è ridotto progressivamente negli anni arrivando nel 2001 all’86%, quando la produzione da fonte nucleare copriva più dell’11% del fabbisogno energetico, ovvero (con più di 170 TWh) quasi il 30% dei consumi elettrici.

039

040

041

Emissioni di anidride carbonica da utilizzo di combustibili fossili per tutti i settori economici. Germania a confronto con gli altri Paesi membri dell’Organizzazione per la Cooperazione e lo Sviluppo Economico (OCSE-OCED). a) Storico delle emissioni per la sola Germania (1965-2015). Le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano come l’effetto della Energiewende abbia lasciato immutata la tendenza consolidata nel periodo 1973-2001. b) Storico delle emissioni per la sola Germania (2002-2015). Le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano variazioni consistenti in controtendenza associabili a particolari periodi di transizione economica, per esempio la crisi del 2008-2009 con la conseguente drastica riduzione dei consumi energetici, e la successiva lenta ripresa. c) Storico delle emissioni cumulative dei Paesi OCSE (2002-2015). Anche qui le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano la drastica riduzione associabile alla crisi economica del 2008-2009. La sostanziale riduzione dopo l’iniziale ripresa del 2010 è associabile all’effetto combinato di maggiore efficientamento dei consumi energetici e lenta ripresa della produzione industriale. d) Peso percentuale delle emissioni della Germania sul totale dei Paesi OCSE. Ultimi due anni a confronto: cresce il ruolo della Germania! Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati BP 2016 [8]
Fig. 7 Emissioni di anidride carbonica da utilizzo di combustibili fossili per tutti i settori economici. Germania a confronto con gli altri Paesi membri dell’Organizzazione per la Cooperazione e lo Sviluppo Economico (OCSE-OCED). a) Storico delle emissioni per la sola Germania (1965-2015). Le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano come l’effetto della Energiewende abbia lasciato immutata la tendenza consolidata nel periodo 1973-2001. b) Storico delle emissioni per la sola Germania (2002-2015). Le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano variazioni consistenti in controtendenza associabili a particolari periodi di transizione economica, per esempio la crisi del 2008-2009 con la conseguente drastica riduzione dei consumi energetici, e la successiva lenta ripresa. c) Storico delle emissioni cumulative dei Paesi OCSE (2002-2015). Anche qui le linee rosse disegnate evidenziano la drastica riduzione associabile alla crisi economica del 2008-2009. La sostanziale riduzione dopo l’iniziale ripresa del 2010 è associabile all’effetto combinato di maggiore efficientamento dei consumi energetici e lenta ripresa della produzione industriale. d) Peso percentuale delle emissioni della Germania sul totale dei Paesi OCSE. Ultimi due anni a confronto: cresce il ruolo della Germania! Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati BP 2016 [8]

É da notare come oltre al petrolio (-19%) anche il carbone abbia visto ridursi considerevolmente la propria incidenza sul paniere energetico (-61%), andando ad impattare in misura molto minore sulle emissioni di carbonio associate al suo utilizzo per la produzione di elettricità.  Di conseguenza, dal 1973 al 2001, a consumi complessivi sostanzialmente invariati – nonostante un PIL in forte crescita (Fig. 8), segno di una maggiore attenzione per il risparmio e l’efficienza energetica – le emissioni tedesche di CO2eq sono calate di quasi un quarto! Tutto questo a fronte di un contributo delle energie rinnovabili ancora del tutto marginale, pari nel 2001 a meno del 3% sul totale, di cui quasi due terzi di origine idroelettrica.

Cosa è accaduto negli anni successivi, fino ai giorni nostri? Nonostante il già menzionato aumento del contributo delle FER, le emissioni sono sì ulteriormente calate (-13% rispetto al 2001), ma senza notevoli variazioni del tasso annuale: in altre parole, a fronte di investimenti economici senza precedenti, il calo ha mantenuto lo stesso trend lineare decrescente dei trent’anni precedenti.

Prodotto Interno Lordo della Germania, nel periodo 1973-2015. Elaborazione di Google aggiornata al 7/10/2016 su dati della Banca Mondiale
Fig. 8 Prodotto Interno Lordo della Germania, nel periodo 1973-2015. Elaborazione di Google aggiornata al 7/10/2016 su dati della Banca Mondiale

Analizzando nel dettaglio l’andamento nell’intervallo 2002-2015 (Fig. 7b), emerge un dato ancora più significativo: negli ultimi sette anni le emissioni si sono sostanzialmente stabilizzate (in controtendenza rispetto all’insieme dei paesi OCSE, Fig. 7c) in un arco temporale in cui anche il prodotto interno lordo tedesco è rimasto pressoché invariato. Qualcosa non torna: il disaccoppiamento tra le emissioni (in calo, -22%) e il PIL (in crescita, +500%), che aveva caratterizzato il periodo tra il 1973 e il 2001, avrebbe dovuto determinare in questi sette anni di stagnazione una riduzione delle emissioni molto più significativa di quella effettivamente registrata. Cosa è andato storto?
La risposta la conosciamo. La crescita delle energie rinnovabili ha eroso solo in minima parte il contributo delle fonti fossili a più elevato tasso di emissioni, andando piuttosto a comprimere sensibilmente la produzione elettrica low carbon nucleare. Per convincerci ulteriormente di quanto questo aspetto abbia effettivamente influito negativamente sulla riduzione delle emissioni, proviamo a formulare una stima numerica, ipotizzando uno scenario alternativo a quello odierno: come sarebbero andate le cose se la percentuale di copertura da fonte nucleare dei consumi interni lordi fosse rimasta quella del 2002?
In quell’anno il contributo nucleare al fabbisogno elettrico era pari al 28%, che se riferito al 2015 equivarrebbe a circa 168 TWh – un valore che la flotta di reattori tedeschi ha dimostrato più volte di essere in grado di raggiungere tra il 1999 e il 2006. Supponendo di sottrarre tutta questa produzione elettrica alle centrali alimentate a carbone e lignite, risulta che le emissioni di CO₂eq nel 2015 sarebbero state inferiori di circa 165 milioni di tonnellate rispetto al valore effettivamente misurato [9]. Si tratta di una valore inferiore del 32% rispetto al dato del 2001! Il dato reale, lo ricordiamo, certifica invece una riduzione di soli 13 punti percentuali in questo intervallo temporale.

Emissioni di anidride carbonica prodotte dal consumo di combustibili fossili in Europa nel 2015. I consumi si riferiscono a tutti i settori, non solo a quello elettrico. Podio: Germania, Regno Unito, Italia
Fig. 9 Emissioni di anidride carbonica prodotte dal consumo di combustibili fossili in Europa nel 2015. I consumi si riferiscono a tutti i settori, non solo a quello elettrico. Podio: Germania, Regno Unito, Italia
Emissioni di gas-serra da tutti i settori economici (escluso Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry, ossia consumo e cambio d’uso del suolo, forestazione ed attività simili). Valori cumulati nel periodo 2000-2014 dai maggiori Paesi europei. Germania solidamente al primo posto, l’Italia agguanta il terzo posto per un soffio. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati OECD.Stat estratti il 18 Nov 2016 07:25 UTC (GMT)
Fig. 10 Emissioni di gas-serra da tutti i settori economici (escluso Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry, ossia consumo e cambio d’uso del suolo, forestazione ed attività simili). Valori cumulati nel periodo 2000-2014 dai maggiori Paesi europei. Germania solidamente al primo posto, l’Italia agguanta il terzo posto per un soffio. Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati OECD.Stat estratti il 18 Nov 2016 07:25 UTC (GMT)

La realtà dei fatti è fotografata dai grafici che mettono a confronto  le emissioni di CO2eq dei diversi Paesi europei (Fig. 9 e 10). Da questo punto di vista, la crescita del ruolo delle FER nel mix energetico tedesco non può che essere considerata una vittoria di Pirro.

Anzi, volendo essere spietatamente realisti, ovvero considerando la questione anche sotto l’aspetto economico, lo scenario futuro più probabile  che si delinea sotto i nostri occhi è quello di un loose-loose. Il sistema di sovvenzioni che ha sorretto l’accelerata delle FER nel settore elettrico tedesco potrebbe presto infatti dimostrarsi economicamente non più sostenibile.
Vediamo come stanno già ora le cose. Quando nel 2000 fu approvata la legge federale sulle FER, fu garantito agli investitori in impianti eolici e solari che avrebbero potuto immettere ogni chilowattora prodotto nella rete ad un prezzo fisso concordato. Per il libero gioco delle forze di mercato è stata una catastrofe, per ragioni che sono evidenti.  Oggi un megawattora di elettricità da un nuovo parco eolico su terraferma è remunerato con € 85 – vale a dire quattro volte il prezzo di mercato. I produttori di elettricità da fonte solare ricevono € 110 per megawattora – ben cinque volte il valore di mercato. L’elettricità dagli aerogeneratori installati in mare è pagata 150 €/MWh – circa sette volte il prezzo di mercato.

E quanto costa l’elettricità per il consumatore finale? In media, le famiglie stanno pagando circa 28 centesimi per chilowattora – vale a dire 280 €/MWh, più di 10 volte il prezzo sul mercato. Un affare!

Storico della composizione del costo medio (c€/kWh) dell’elettricità per un nucleo famigliare tipo (3.500 kWh/anno) in Germania. Fonte: elaborazione CLEW su dati BDEW, 2016
Fig. 11 Storico della composizione del costo medio (c€/kWh) dell’elettricità per un nucleo famigliare tipo (3.500 kWh/anno) in Germania. Fonte: elaborazione CLEW su dati BDEW, 2016

Dove va la differenza? I gestori della rete ricevono, se va bene, un quarto del prezzo dell’energia elettrica pagato dal consumatore finale. Una situazione alla quale noi italiani siamo, come dire, abituati. E forse il nostro lettore medio avrà già intuito il perché della suddetta discrepanza. Tuttavia, su tali questioni è sempre meglio scendere nel dettaglio; abbiamo quindi riportato in Fig. 11 un grafico del Clean Energy Wire (CLEW), uno dei più importanti think tank sulle politiche energetiche tedesche, elaborato a partire dai dati più recenti della Bundesverband der Energie und Wasserwirtschaft (BDEW) [2].

Unendo ai factsheet del CLEW quelli di Agora Energiewende (altro think tank da seguire attentamente), è possibile aggiungere ulteriori dettagli. Ecco dunque la situazione a gennaio 2016, quando per un nucleo famigliare tipo in Germania il costo di un kWh di elettricità (circa 0,29 euro) era composto come segue:

21,3%  cost of power supply (costi di fornitura e margine di profitto per il fornitore)

24,6%  grid charges (costi fissi per utilizzo della rete elettrica stabiliti dal gestore della medesima – i.e. autorità federale di riferimento)

22,2%  renewable energy surcharge (ammontare dei sussidi e/o incentivi stabiliti dalla EEG per garantire l’economicità degli impianti da fonti rinnovabili)

16%     sales tax (imposta analoga all’I.V.A.)

7,2%    electricity tax (tassa sull’utilizzo dell’elettricità, detta anche “tassa ecologica”)

5,8%    concession levy (tributo basato sull’utilizzo del suolo pubblico tramite le linee di trasmissione e distribuzione da parte del fornitore per raggiungere il consumatore)

0,1%    levy for offshore liabilities (tributo per compensare i costi di gestione della rete dovuti a problemi di connessione con gli aerogeneratori installati in mare)

1,5%    surcharge for Combined Heat and Power plants (ammontare dei sussidi e/o incentivi stabiliti dalla EEG per garantire l’economicità degli impianti a cogenerazione)

1,3%    levy for grid charges to large users (tributo per compensare l’esenzione dei costi di gestione della rete garantita ai grandi consumatori – i.e. industrie, servizi pubblici, ecc.)

Costo medio dell’elettricità per i consumatori domestici (nuclei familiari con consumi annui compresi tra i 2.500 kWh ed i 5.000 kWh). Secondo semestre 2015, Europa. Valori in euro. Fonte Eurostat
Fig. 12 Costo medio dell’elettricità per i consumatori domestici (nuclei familiari con consumi annui compresi tra i 2.500 kWh ed i 5.000 kWh). Secondo semestre 2015, Europa. Valori in euro. Fonte Eurostat
Consumi medi e bollette elettriche in alcuni Paesi c.d. sviluppati (valori approssimativi per il periodo 2011-2015, anche a causa del cambio valuta) – si noti che, dato l’elevato costo del chilowattora, la bolletta degli italiani è la meno cara della lista solo grazie ai bassi consumi elettrici. É importante sottolineare che i consumi pro-capite di elettricità, in Italia, sono inferiori alla media europea in quanto si ricorre maggiormente al gas per uso domestico (cottura cibi e riscaldamento). Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Eurostat e Agora Energiewende/ e EI New Energy, Vol. III, No. 28
Fig. 13 Consumi medi e bollette elettriche in alcuni Paesi c.d. sviluppati (valori approssimativi per il periodo 2011-2015, anche a causa del cambio valuta) – si noti che, dato l’elevato costo del chilowattora, la bolletta degli italiani è la meno cara della lista solo grazie ai bassi consumi elettrici. É importante sottolineare che i consumi pro-capite di elettricità, in Italia, sono inferiori alla media europea in quanto si ricorre maggiormente al gas per uso domestico (cottura cibi e riscaldamento). Fonte: elaborazione CNeR su dati Eurostat e Agora Energiewende/ e EI New Energy, Vol. III, No. 28

In sostanza, i consumatori tedeschi medio-piccoli debbono pagare tutte le distorsioni del mercato elettrico. E va sottolineato il fatto che i gestori della rete sono autorizzati a passare al cliente l’intera differenza tra i costi elevati di remunerazione dell’energia elettrica “verde” e il prezzo di mercato. Più basso è il prezzo di mercato, maggiore è tale discrepanza, nota appunto come “prelievo EEG”, che quest’anno ha già superato ampiamente i 6 centesimi di euro per chilowattora. Complessivamente, i “prelievi EEG” nel 2016 dovrebbero sfiorare i 23 miliardi di euro (stima sulle attuali quotazioni EEX); mentre l’elettricità “verde” prodotta dovrebbe avere un valore inferiore ai 4 miliardi di euro.

Ecco cosa intendevamo con “corpo” quando abbiamo scritto nel nostro precedente post sulla Energiewende che la Germania si è dedicata “anima e corpo” alla sua transizione energetica: i prezzi dell’elettricità per i consumatori sono tra i più alti d’Europa (Fig. 12 e 13)!

Va aggiunto che la prima stima completa dei costi della Energiewende al 2025 risulta pari a oltre 520 miliardi di euro per il solo settore elettrico. Questa cifra interessante viene da un report commissionato all’Università di Düsseldorf, precisamente al Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE), per conto della Initiative New Social Market Economy (INSM), ed è composta per il 78% dal “prelievo EEG”, mentre l’espansione delle reti di trasmissione e distribuzione vale l’11% [3].

Di fronte all’evidenza di costi tanto elevati sappiamo bene quanto sia forte la tentazione di obiettare che in fondo tutto ha un costo e che l’ottenimento di un risultato ecologicamente sostenibile quasi non ha prezzo. Tuttavia, attenzione, perché ogni transizione energetica non solo ha un costo economico ma anche uno ecologico, dato che per usare una metafora “i pannelli fotovoltaici non crescono sugli alberi e gli aerogeneratori non spuntano come i funghi”.

Inoltre, di quale risultato ecologico stiamo parlando? Per favore tornate alla Fig. 9! Forse esiste un commento più appropriato per quel grafico, noi non riusciamo a trovare che questo: ad oggi la Energiewende si è rivelata costosamente inutile.

Energia fotovoltaica in chiave surrealista
Fig. 14 Energia fotovoltaica in chiave surrealista

(continua…)

Note:

[1]       Bundesnetzagentur, autorità tedesca per il mercato dell’energia elettrica, del gas, delle telecomunicazioni, delle poste e delle ferrovie.

[2]       Sorta di consorzio federale per la gestione delle forniture energetiche e della rete idrica.

[3]       Fonte: Comunicato stampa della Initiative Neue Soziale Marktwirtschaft e relativi allegati, consultabile al link http://www.insm.de/insm/Presse/Pressemeldungen/Pressemeldung-Studie-EEG.html

[4]       Comunicazione della CEPS, gestore di rete ceco, come riportato dalla World Nuclear Association qui: http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/energy-and-the-environment/energiewende.aspx

[5]       Il termine tecnico è Quadrature booster (anche phase-shifting transformer, o phase angle regulator, se made in USA). Questi trasformatori regolano lo sfasamento tra la tensione in ingresso e quella in uscita di una linea di trasmissione elettrica, controllando così la quantità di potenza attiva (active power, o real power) che vi può fluire. Fonte: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadrature_booster

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power#Real_power

[6]       Nel linguaggio economico, il dumping rappresenta la vendita all’estero di un bene/servizio a prezzi inferiori rispetto a quelli praticati sul mercato interno.

[7]       Prendendo in considerazione l’intero ciclo di vita di un impianto di produzione di energia elettrica (Life Cycle Assessment), il gas è tra tutte le fonti fossili quella a minor tasso di emissioni – circa la metà rispetto a petrolio e carbone – a parità di elettricità prodotta.

Fonte: IPCC SRREN, Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Mitigation, http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/report/IPCC_SRREN_Full_Report.pdf

[8]       I dati sulle emissioni di anidride carbonica registrati dalla BP riguardano solo la post-combustione di carbone fossile, gas, petrolio e derivati, e si basano sui Default CO₂ Emissions Factors for Combustion dell’IPCC (2006). Una spiegazione del metodo di calcolo di tali emissioni è consualtibile al seguente link: http://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/pdf/energy-economics/statistical-review-2016/bp-statistical-review-of-world-energy-2016-carbon-emissions-methodology.pdf

[9]       Per i calcoli abbiamo utilizzato le mediane dei tassi di emissione per unità di corrente elettrica generata (gCO2/kWh), valutati sul ciclo di vita degli impianti e del combustibile.  Dalla più recente pubblicazione dell’IPCC sul tema, i dati relativi alle centrali a carbone e a quelle nucleari sono rispettivamente 1001 gCO2 /kWh e 16 gCO2/kWh.